Prayers for Peace in a Broken World

DepressionWhen you hear the phrase ‘the terrifying ticking time bomb’, chances are you don’t take it seriously. In the Western world, we have grown accustomed to our first world problems, getting all hot and bothered over inconsequential things such as what’s on your coffee cup or the speed of your online movie buffering. Sure, we have our fair share of severe problems, and I don’t want to make light of these things, such as economic disparity or massive social inequality, but the last few months have opened up millions of eyes in America, especially when it comes to the rage and sadness buried deep inside the human race. Tragedies in San Bernardino, Paris, and the ongoing Syrian Civil War have created a dark night of the soul for humanity and the anxiety has forced all of us from our homes whether we realize it or not.

We must do all we can to help this broken world. Isn’t that the true meaning of the holiday season, why we celebrate Hanukkah, Christmas, and others? We must unite like never before, transform ourselves into prayers for peace in a broken world. That would be the best gift this holiday season. At Atlanta Jewish & Interfaith Weddings, I help bring people together in the name of love. Whether it is a traditional Jewish Wedding, Interfaith Wedding, or LGBT Wedding, it is my honor to be involved in your special day, to assist your hearts in the unification process. I play a little role in sending love into the world and that is something I take a great deal of pride in. I guess you could say that what I do is similar to what John Lennon did in his life through his music. Two days ago, on December 8, we observed the 35th anniversary of his unfortunate death and many publications reflected on what Lennon did for the world, one such publication being Big Think in this article.

In honor of his memory, Lori Chandler analyzed 7 of his songs and applied their meanings to life today. One song sticks out in particular and that’s 1967’s “With A Little Help From My Friends,” the classic from Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. She writes, “The sentiment is that even though we feel afraid or alone at times, it is through our friends that we are “gonna try” to keep going. The late ‘60s were a time of intense violence and uncertainty, not unlike today. The truth of this song is that everyone, from Lennon to you and me, needs social support to feel better.”

That is a great breakdown of the song and it is a message that is at the heart of what I do at Atlanta Jewish & Interfaith Weddings. Although the world is a terrifying ticking time bomb, we can make it with a little help from our friends. That is something to keep in mind this holiday season.

Written by Rabbi Lebow

Rabbi Lebow

Rabbi Lebow offers interfaith wedding services throughout the United States

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